Running the sim

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Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Fri Apr 11, 2008 10:00 pm

Here is a link to the disk I would need to run the sim. Cost is $29.99. One of the neat features is that we would be able to choose which park you want for your home field. There are a lot of historical parks on the disk.

If we decide to go this route, how does a one time $2 per person fee sound? If you paid and played this time around, then next draft, there is no cost to you, only new players that joined for the first time. Once the disk is paid for I'm open to suggestions as to what to do with the extra money.

Jay

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Re: Running the sim

Post by fisherboy7 on Fri Apr 11, 2008 10:34 pm

Sounds good Jay. Let's see how the first 16 rounds work out. If it goes well, we can add an additional 8 round "expansion draft" at the end so we can fill out the rosters to fit your sim.

Can you find out what roster positions need to be filled on the sim? I recall you saying 24 players per team, but need to know the specific positions.

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Jay, Ben and others....

Post by Square_Frame_Ramly on Fri Apr 11, 2008 11:15 pm

I am willing to fork over the $30 by myself....my little contribution to Full Count and the members. Let me know how i can get you the money Jay.

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Re: Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Sat Apr 12, 2008 1:56 am

Everyone will need to give their manager details. Here is an outline of what is needed:

The computer manager makes decisions based on the score, inning, number of
outs, who is on base, the ability of the pitcher and catcher, the ballpark,
availability of bench players, and many other factors. The instructions you
provide are among the most important factors that are considered.
Consider a few examples:


  • Suppose, in real life, a certain pitcher was always used as the closer, but
    was ineffective. If your goal is to emulate a real-life season, put the
    real-life closer first in your list of closers. If you want to see how the
    season might have turned out with another pitcher in this role, put the other
    pitcher first in your list of closers. The choice is yours.

  • Suppose, in real life, a speedy player was used as the leadoff hitter on your
    favorite team, but you prefer to give up some speed and use a player with a
    higher on-base percentage in this spot. Your saved lineups are used by the
    computer manager to determine the batting order versus left- and right-handed
    pitching.

  • Suppose, in real life, a team used the sacrifice bunt more frequently than
    any other team in the league. But you believe in playing for the three-run
    homer. You can instruct the computer manager to bunt less often.

The manager profile contains instructions for five aspects of managing your
team:
The links won't work since they are tied to my computer, but they will be in following posts.

Jay

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Re: Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Sat Apr 12, 2008 1:57 am

The pitching chart includes your starting rotation, rules for how your
starters are to be used, a list of other pitchers who may start from time to
time, and the assignment of relief pitchers to various roles.
Roles


You can assign up to five pitchers to each of the following roles:


  • Starting rotation. You identify the
    pitchers that make up your starting rotation and the order in which they appear.
    You can use a rotation with three, four or five pitchers -- just leave spots
    empty if you don't want to use five pitchers. You also indicate whether starting
    pitchers should be used in strict rotation, in rotation but with the option to
    jump to the #1 starter if off-days make him available, or in proportion to the
    number of starts made in real life.

  • Spot Starters. If you want a pitcher
    to make occasional starts, you can designate that player as a spot starter. The
    list of spot starters parallels the list of pitchers in the starting rotation.
    If you want someone to start 20% of the time in place of the number four
    starter, enter this player in the fourth spot in the spot starter list, and
    enter 20 when you are prompted for the percentage.

  • Mopup situations. You can designate up
    to five pitchers for the mopup role. This role is used for the weaker pitchers
    on the team. They will normally be used only when your team is winning or losing
    by a large margin and the outcome of the game isn't really in doubt, though they
    may appear in close games if other pitchers are not available due to injury or
    fatigue.

  • Long Relief. You can designate
    pitchers for the role of long relief. Long relievers are generally used when the
    starting pitcher is replaced prior to the seventh inning, but will also be used
    in other game situations when required, particularly when a team is losing by a
    large margin and wants to preserve its better pitchers for future games.

  • Setup Men. There are two lists of
    setup men, one to face left-handed batters and one to face right-handed batters.
    Setup men are generally used in the seventh inning or later in close games, but
    will also be used in other situations when required.

  • Closers. There are two lists of
    closers, one to face left-handed batters and one to face right-handed batters.
    Closers are generally used in the eighth or ninth inning when the team has a
    lead in a close game, but will also be used in other situations when
    required.

In most game situations, the computer manager uses the first available
pitcher in the appropriate list whenever a reliever is called for (excluding
players on the reserve roster). So it is important that you list your players in
the order you wish them to be considered, with your first choice at the top of
the list.
However, there are other situations where another choice will be made. If the
bullpen has been used heavily, the computer manager may use the most rested
pitcher. If either team has a big lead, it may choose to use a less talented
pitcher to make sure your top pitchers are rested for future games. If a game
goes into extra innings, everyone in the bullpen is a candidate to enter the
game.
Enter a pitcher on more than one list if you want him to be considered for
more than one role. For example, your top setup man may also be your number two
closer. However, there is no need to fill up all of the lists, since the
computer manager chooses from other lists if nobody in a particular role is
available.
Usage Mode


The usage mode governs how starting
pitchers are selected.
Select Time mode to have the computer
manager do its best to make sure that every starting pitcher and reliever gets
exactly as many starts and relief appearances as they had in real life. This
mode is appropriate for teams that have their real-life rosters intact, and it
should NOT be used when you are playing a season with newly-drafted rosters.

NOTE: In Time mode, the computer manager ignores your
rotation. Instead, it looks at how many starts each pitcher is limited to in the
playing
time limits
section of your profile
(this is usually set to match his real-life starts) and spreads those starts
evenly over the season. The pitcher with the most real-life starts will be
selected on opening day even if he is not listed in the #1 slot in the rotation.
The computer manager will choose starting pitchers who are not in the rotation
if their games started limit is greater than zero.
Select Strict mode to have the
computer manager use your pitchers in the order they appear in the starting
rotation. The computer manager will choose another starting pitcher only if a
rotation starter is injured when his turn comes up.
Select Skip to have the computer
manager use your pitchers in the order they appear in the starting rotation but
skip to the #1 starter when one or more off-days have left him rested enough to
start before his turn. The computer manager will choose another starting pitcher
only if a rotation starter is injured when his turn comes up.
The Strict option is usually best for
DMB leagues that are using newly-drafted rosters.
Rotation Size


You can enter a number to tell the computer manager how big the starting
rotation should be. Modern teams almost always use a five-man rotation. Four-man
rotations were common until the 1970s, and smaller rotations were the norm a
hundred years ago.
Although the saved starting rotation is ignored
in the Usage
mode
of Time, it is still important to set your rotation size
in order to get the most out of your starting pitchers. If a pitcher made 40
starts, the rotation size must be set no higher than 4 in order for him to reach
his maximum number of starts. If you set the size at 5, he won't make more than
33 starts in a 162-game season.
The rotation size is also used to enforce a Strict or Skip rotation.
Next Starter
When you are using either the Strict
or Skip rotation mode, this value tells
the computer manager which rotation slot is due to start the next game. You can
change this if you want to juggle your rotation during a season.

NOTE: When the computer manager selects a starting pitcher in
Strict or Skip mode, it simply chooses the pitcher who is in the Next starter
slot. It doesn't look at who was used in recent games, so it's up to you to make
sure that the Next starter value is set appropriately if you are mixing
human-managed games and computer-managed games for this team.

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Re: Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Sat Apr 12, 2008 1:58 am

Batting Line ups

You may create up to six saved lineups in a team's manager profile. Each
lineup is tagged with two indicators so the computer manager knows when to use
the lineup:


  • whether to use it against left- or right-handed pitchers

  • whether to use it in DH games or non-DH games

Whenever you play (or autoplay) a game with the computer manager handling
this team, the computer manager searches the list of six saved lineups and
selects the first one that matches the opposing pitcher and DH rule for that
game.
If you plan to manage the team yourself, you can choose to load any of the
six saved lineups at the beginning of the game.
One way to use the additional saved lineups is in leagues. If you have a five
game road series coming up, you can define a saved lineup and depth chart for
each game, and tell the home manager to use these five lineups in the series.
The home manager would set your team's manager for Starting lineups to Human
(leaving all other manager options set to Computer) and make all of the pregame
lineup selections. The computer manager would then makes in-game substitutions
and tactical decisions. See Managers:
Human or Computer
for more details.
You select who plays each defensive position and the batting order. If
necessary due to injuries, fatigue, or the desire to give a spot starter his
share of playing time, the computer manager adjusts the starting lineup and
batting order. When adjusting the batting order, the computer manager moves the
newly-inserted players up or down in the order based on their ability, but
preserves your saved batting order as much as possible.
Depth charts


Each saved lineup goes hand-in-hand with its depth
chart
. The depth chart identifies the roles assigned to all players who are
not already in the starting lineup. Whenever you make a change to a saved
lineup, it's a good idea to see if the starter you just replaced should be
assigned one or more roles in the accompanying depth chart.
Usage modes


Sometimes the computer manager chooses to use a spot starter in place of the
players who is listed in the saved lineup. See the depth chart topic for a description of these usage
modes and how they affect the computer manager's decisions about spot
starts.

TIP: If you want the computer manager to use your saved
lineups exactly as they are in the manager profile, make sure you have chosen
the Game by
game
usage mode and that none of the utility
players in the accompanying depth charts have spot start percentages greater
than zero. With those settings, the computer manager will replace a starter only
when he is injured.
Adjusting the batting order


Whenever the computer manager is unable to use the saved lineup as-is because
of injuries or spot starts, it may make adjustments to the batting order. Its
main goal when making these adjustments is to preserve your saved lineup as much
as possible.

If, for example, your #7 hitter is out with an
injury, the computer manager won't change the order of the top six hitters in
the lineup. If, however, your #3 hitter is hurt, and his replacement is a much
weaker offensive player, the computer manager will shift the replacement to a
lower spot in the batting order and put another player in the #3 spot. This type
of adjustment may also involve moving a couple of other players around.

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Re: Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Sat Apr 12, 2008 1:59 am

Depth Charts


A depth chart goes hand in hand with a saved
lineup
, and guides the computer manager in its use of players who are not in
the starting lineup. There are four roles that you can assign to a bench player
in a depth chart:


  • Platoon Player. A platoon is a pair of
    players, one who bats left-handed and one who bats right-handed. The manager
    starts the left-hander against right-handed pitchers and the right-hander
    against left-handed pitchers. If the opposing team changes pitchers, the
    computer manager may substitute the platoon player to get a favorable left-right
    matchup.

  • Defensive Replacement. If you specify
    a player in this role, the player will be inserted into a game in the late
    innings of games in which the team has a narrow lead.

  • Utility Player. You can list up to
    five players as utility players at each defensive position. These players are
    used when a starter is injured or removed for a pinch hitter or pinch runner
    during a game. If you want someone to be used primarily as a bench player but
    make occasional starts, you can indicate the percentage of games this player
    should start at this position.

  • Pinch Hitter. You can list up to five
    players as pinch hitters versus left- or right-handed pitchers.

See below for suggestions and guidelines that may help you decide how to set
up your depth charts.
Defensive replacements


The computer manager currently makes defensive replacement decisions one
position at a time. That means that there's no point in trying to set up your
profile to make a series of defensive shifts.
For example, you cannot tell the computer manager to insert a player as a
defensive replacement in center, move the starting center fielder to right, and
remove the right fielder.
Pinch hitters


You don't have to fill the list in to make the
computer manager use pinch hitters. If these lists are empty, DMB chooses pinch hitters
from all available players on the bench, including starters who are resting for
the current game.
However, if you choose to enter one or more players in these lists, DMB
chooses only from among these players when a pinch hitter is called for. If none
of these players is available, the computer manager then looks to the full bench
to see if another hitter could be used.
The computer manager doesn't always choose the first player in the list as
the first pinch hitter in the game. Sometimes it will choose to keep the top
player available for a better opportunity later in the game.
Pinch hitting and playing time limits


If your league is using the Limit bench
playing time
option, potential pinch hitters will be left on the bench if
they are ahead of their playing time pace for the season. This is true even if
you're down by nine runs and the pitcher is due up.
Sometimes all potential pinch hitters are ineligible for this reason and the
computer manager will allow the pitcher to bat for himself. It may seem strange
to let a pitcher bat in these situations, but the computer manager has no way to
simultaneously accomplish the two things you've asked it to do -- make good game
decisions and enforce the playing time limits. Usually the solution is to turn
off the Limit bench playing time
option.
See Leagues: Rules and Options for
more details on this setting.
Usage modes


The offensive portion of your manager profile is assigned one of two usage
modes. These modes apply only when the computer manager is handling this
team.
Choose Track starts if you wish to
simulate an entire season and you want your players to match the playing time
indicated in the depth chart. With this setting, the computer manager keeps
track of how often each player starts at each position versus left- and
right-handed pitching in your DMB games. During the season, it uses this
information to adjust the starting lineups to keep everyone on a pace to
accumulate the amount of playing time indicated in your depth charts.

NOTE: If your goal is to match real-life playing time as
closely as possible, we recommend that you choose None for your league injury rule and Yes for the Limit Bench Playing Time option. See Leagues: Rules
and Options
for more details on these
settings.
Choose Game by game if you want to
change the roles of your players during a season. With this setting, the
computer manager takes each game at a time and randomly chooses spot starters
using the spot start percentages in your depth chart.
Example. Suppose a player is listed in
a utility role in a depth chart and has been assigned a spot start percentage of
30. And suppose you have played the first half of the season and are ready to
begin the second half. Using the Track starts option, the computer manager would immediately start
this player several games in a row because he is far behind the pace necessary
to reach the target of 30% starts. Using the Game by game option, the computer manager would give this player
a 30% chance to start each subsequent game.

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Re: Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Sat Apr 12, 2008 2:01 am

Playing time limits


You may choose to put limits on playing time for one or all of the players on
your team. These limits are enforced only when other league options and manager
profile settings are set a certain way, and we'll point out those dependencies
below.
You can also put limits on the ability of the computer manager to remove
certain players for pinch hitters. These limits are not dependent on any other
settings -- they always apply when the computer manager is handling a team.
Pitching limits


You can limit the number of games started and relief appearances each pitcher
will make. These limits apply only if you choose a usage mode of Time for the pitching portion of your manager
profile.
In Time mode, the computer manager ignores your rotation.
Instead, it looks at how many starts each pitcher is limited to and spreads
those starts evenly over the season. The pitcher with the most real-life starts
will be selected on opening day even if he is not listed in the #1 slot in the
rotation. The computer manager will choose starting pitchers who are not in the
rotation if their games started limit is greater than zero.
After the starting pitcher has been selected,
the computer manager will mark as ineligible any relief pitchers who are on a
pace to exceed their limit for relief appearances.
Atbat limits


For batters, you can indicate how many atbats they are allowed to get against
left- and right-handed pitching. These limits are enforced only if you play
games using the Limit Bench Playing Time
option, which is described in the Leagues: Rules and Options topic.
When this option is in effect, DMB will not use players as substitutes if it would put them on a pace
to exceed their limits, unless injuries or ejections make it necessary to use
the player.
These limits have no effect on starting
lineups
. DMB assumes that if you want to limit playing time with this
option, you will take care to ensure that these players are not put in any of
the saved lineups and are not assigned spot start percentages that would cause
them to get too many starts.
The purpose of the playing time limits is to control the use of players with
extremely good statistics that were compiled in a limited number of real-life
atbats.
A good example is a player who batted .350 in 25 atbats. Without these
limits, DMB's computer manager would be inclined to use him very frequently as a
pinch-hitter or as a replacement during a game, and he might get 100 atbats in
the DMB-league season. If this player is not used in either saved lineup, the
Limit Bench Playing Time option would limit his atbats to about 25 unless
injuries forced him into more games.
You may want to set limits just for the players with extremely strong batting
statistics. There are many other players who played sparingly in real life
because they were in injured, on the farm team, or because there were better
players ahead of them. These players are not likely to be overused by the
computer manager, so you may want to set very high limits for them so they are
available whenever they are needed.

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Re: Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Sat Apr 12, 2008 2:02 am

Manager Tendencies


There are twenty tactics for which you can influence how the computer manager
makes its decisions:


  • seven govern offensive plays: bunting
    for a hit, sacrifice bunting, squeeze bunting, using the hit and run, stealing,
    baserunning, and taking pitches.

  • four influence how frequently pinch
    hitters
    will be used in various situations: for a pitcher, for a
    non-pitcher, for a platoon partner, and in the late innings of a blowout.

  • three affect defensive tactics:
    holding runners, guarding the lines, and bringing the infield in.

  • and six help determine how the pitching staff is used: pitching around
    hitters, intentionally walking hitters, pitching out, making pickoff throws,
    using relief pitchers, and using closers.

The values you can set for each tactic are Most Frequent, More Frequent,
Neutral, Less Frequent, and Least Frequent.
Playing the Percentages


For each of these tactics, Diamond Mind has studied play-by-play data to
analyze the frequency with which they are deployed by real-life managers. We
have examined how those frequencies are affected by the inning, number of outs,
the score, baserunner locations, the ability of the players involved, and other
factors.
When set to Neutral, the computer
manager attempts to replicate these real life patterns by choosing, for example,
to bunt with only the best bunters in the most appropriate bunting situations
and when the batter wouldn't do better against this particular pitcher by
swinging away. In other words, if you set everything to Neutral, the computer manager plays the
percentages.
Based on an analysis of thousands of real-life games, the computer manager
knows the odds of winning a game in any situation (such as when you're the away
team and down by a run in the seventh), and it knows the probability of scoring
a certain number of runs in any situation. So it sometimes plays for a big
inning, and sometimes it plays for one run, whichever gives it the best chance
to win. And it preserves the element of surprise, so you cannot always predict
what the computer manager will do in a particular situation.
If all of your manager tendencies are set to Neutral, a team with more good base-stealers
will steal more often than a team with fewer good base-stealers. A team with
more good runners will take more extra bases on hits and flies than a team with
fewer good runners. This is equally true of real-life rosters and draft-league
rosters. As a result, the Neutral setting is the
best choice for most teams
, especially teams with which you are not too
familiar.
The other settings are intended to override the computer manager's natural
inclination to play the percentages. If you want your team to sacrifice bunt
less often, despite having many good bunters, set your Sacrifice bunting
tendency to Less Frequent or Least Frequent. If you want your team to try to
pressure your opponent into making throwing errors, set your Running tendency to
More Frequent or Most Frequent. But be aware that being more aggressive may mean
taking more chances than the percentages would normally call for.
What the settings mean


Because there are too many variations in game situations and talent levels
among different rosters, there are no precise answers to the question, "What
will the computer manager do if I choose this setting?" However, you may want to
consider the following when making your choices, then play some games using the
computer manager to see how it handles your team in different situations:

Bunting.
As is the case with all tendencies, a player's bunt rating is still the most
important factor in determining how often the computer manager asks a player to
bunt, but you can use the three bunting tendencies to increase or decrease bunt
attempts by the players on your team.

The squeeze bunt tendency is used whenever there's
a runner on third with less than two outs. While it is true that
some real-life managers will use the sacrifice bunt with runners on first or
third in order to move the runner from first to second and holding the runner at
third, the DMB computer manager does not use this tactic. It prefers not to give
up an out when it already has a runner in scoring position.

The bunt for
hit
tendency is used whenever there are two out, the bases are empty, and
in a couple of other situations where runners are on base but sacrificing makes
little sense. For
example, with a position player at the plate, real-life managers rarely call for
a sacrifice with one out and a single runner on either first or second, so DMB uses the bunt for hit tendency in those
situations. With
nobody out, or a pitcher at the plate, it's a different story, and DMB uses the
sacrifice bunt tendency in those cases.

The sacrifice
bunt
tendency is used with nobody out and a runner on first, a runner on
second, or runners on both first and second. With one out, the
sacrifice bunt tendency is used with a pitcher at the plate, but the bunt for
hit tendency is used when a position player is batting, because real-life
position players rarely sacrifice with one out. More often than not,
they're bunting for a hit even with a runner on base.

Hit and
run
. When
deciding whether to use the hit and run, the computer manager is looking
primarily at the batter's ability to make contact (and thereby protect the
runner) and the likelihood that he'll hit into a double play if he does. High strikeout rates
discourage the use of the hit and run, while high rates of ground ball double
plays encourage the use of this tactic. The settings for this
tactic nudge the computer manager in the direction you choose by adjusting the
contact-rate and GDP-rate thresholds it uses to make these decisions.
Stealing. When set to Neutral, the computer manager is reluctant to
attempt steals with runners owning low Steal ratings, since they will be thrown out
too often. If you want to further restrict your steal attempts to those players
with the highest steal ratings, choose Less
Frequent
or Least Frequent. This
will not stop your best stealers from running, but will restrain other
players.

Running. This
tendency governs how many chances the computer manager will take on the base
paths. When the computer manager makes a running decision, it compares the
chances of gaining the extra base
safely to a minimum threshold based on
the game situation.
The chances of gaining the extra base are determined by the nature of the
batted ball, whether the runner was going on the pitch or on contact, the
running rating of the runner, and the throwing rating of the outfielder.
The minimum threshold is based on the game situation and whether it makes
more sense to play for one run (as in the late innings of a close game) or a big
inning. Depending on the number of outs and where the runners are situated, the
value of taking the extra base can be high or low, as can be the cost of getting
thrown out. The computer manager takes these factors into consideration when
deciding how high the chances of success need to be to justify taking the risk
of getting thrown out.
The Running tendency controls the minimum threshold. If you choose "less
frequent" or "least frequent", the minimum threshold rises. That causes the
computer manager to send the runner only when the chances of success are higher.
If you choose "more frequent" or "more frequent", the minimum threshold is
lowered, and the computer manager will take more chances.

NOTE: This tendency applies
to singles, doubles and fly balls. It does not affect the decision to send the
runner home from third on a ground ball.

Taking pitches. This tendency enables
you to increase or decrease the likelihood that your best hitters will have the green light to swing with
three balls and no strikes. It doesn't affect
any other counts. And you don't need to use this tendency to prevent your weaker
hitters from swinging at 3-0 pitches because the computer manager never gives
them the green light.
Pinch hitting. In all game situations
other than blowouts, the computer manager uses a pinch hitter only if he is
rated to be better than the scheduled hitter against the current pitcher. This assessment
takes into account the handedness and the left/right splits of both the batter
and the pitcher.
A "least frequent" setting tells the computer manager to pinch hit less
often; that is, only when the pinch hitter is much better than the scheduled
hitter. A "most frequent" setting tells the computer manager to pinch hit more
aggressively; that is, even when the pinch hitter is only a little better than
the scheduled hitter.
Pinch hitting in blowouts is a different matter altogether. In these
situations, the goal is not to gain an advantage, it's to replace the team's
better players to reduce their risk of injury. In blowouts, the computer manager
generally replaces a better player with a weaker one, so the relative strength
of the players is not a concern. Instead, the blowout pinch hitting tendency
influences the computer manager decisions about (a) how big a lead is needed for
the game to be treated as a blowout and (b) how early in the game it will begin
to remove players. In
blowout situations, the "In blowouts" tendency takes precedence over the other
pinch hitting tendencies.
Holding runners. When set to Neutral, all runners but the worst are held.
Choosing Most Frequent causes all runners to be held. Choosing Least Frequent causes the first basemen to play
behind runners with low Jump and Steal ratings.
Guard the lines. This setting controls
the inning in which the computer manager begins to think about guarding the
lines:


Tendency

Inning

Most frequent, more frequent

7th

Neutral

8th

Less frequent

9th

Least frequent

never

Infield in. This setting controls the
inning in which the computer manager begins looking for opportunities to bring
the infield in:


Tendency

Inning

Most frequent

1st

More frequent

4th

Neutral

6th

Less frequent

7th

Least frequent

8th

This tendency does not affect the decision to bring the infield in at the
corners, which can occur anytime during a game to discourage a batter from
bunting.

Pitching around
and Intentional walk
. The computer manager
issues intentional walks with first base open and a dangerous hitter at the
plate if the on-deck hitter is much less of a threat. If the intentional
walk tendency is set to most frequent, the computer manager will issue a walk
with a smaller difference in hitting ability between the next two hitters. If it is set to least
frequent, the computer manager will issue the walk only if the current hitter is
even more dangerous relative to the on-deck hitter.


If the next hitter is more dangerous than the
on-deck hitter, but not to a large enough degree to convince the computer
manager to issue an intentional walk, the computer manager might instruct the
pitcher to pitch around the next hitter. The pitching around
tendency is very similar to the intentional walk tendency in that it determines
how large the gap in hitting ability must be to justify the decision to pitch
around a hitter.

Pickoff throws and
pitchouts
. Both
of these tactics are used to slow down opposing base stealers. You may find that the
"most frequent" and "more frequent" tendencies are helpful, especially if your
pitcher and catcher are not especially good at shutting down the running game
without a little extra help. Keep in mind, however,
that pitchouts can give the hitter an advantage in the ball-strike count and too
many pickoff throws can lead to errors and/or wear and tear on the pitcher's
arm.

Using relievers,
using closers
.
The decision to use a
reliever is very complex. Each decision involves
so many factors -- including the inning, score, location of baserunners, quality
of the current pitcher, quality of the potential reliever, left/right matchups,
fatigue, the makeup of the pitching portion of the manager profile, fatigue, and
more -- that it's not possible to lay out simple rules that tell you exactly how
these tendencies will affect the computer manager's decisions. The basic idea,
however, is that they influence how quickly the computer manager will make the
move to bring in a reliever (in non-save situations) or the closer (in save
situations) when the current pitcher begins to get into trouble.

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Re: Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Sat Apr 12, 2008 2:03 am

Player Tendencies


Reasonable limits


DMB is a strategy game that is designed to provide you with a real baseball
experience. It's not
like many video games that give you so much control that you can easily play
games and produce statistics that bear little or no resemblance to real
big-league games. As a
result, there are reasonable limits on the impact of player tendencies.
It's not possible, for example, to set a tendency that tells a certain player
to attempt a steal every time he reaches first base with second base open. There
isn't a player in history who has done that, and it's just not realistic to
allow that to happen in your DMB games. Similarly, it doesn't make sense to
allow a runner with a Poor jump rating and a Poor steal rating to attempt 50
steals a season.
It is possible, however, to set a player's Stealing tendency to Most
Frequent. By doing so, you're telling the computer manager to give that player
the green light more often than it normally
would for a player with his ratings
.
How much more often? It varies from tactic to tactic, but it's generally in
the range of 20-40%. In other words, you can't use player tendencies to double
or triple the rate at which a player attempts to steal, take extra bases, bunt
for hits, and so on. Game situations and player ratings are still the most
important factor in how the computer manager makes decisions.
On the other hand, it's not all that unusual for a real-life player to go
several seasons without trying to steal a base or drop down a bunt. So it is
possible to assign a Never tendency, and
the computer manager will honor that request.
Offensive tendencies


Most of these tendencies have the same meaning as in the context of manager tendencies, so we won't describe them again
here.
Bunting. As is the case with all
tendencies, a player's bunt rating is still the most important factor in
determining how often the computer manager asks a player to bunt, but you can
use the three bunting tendencies to increase, decrease, or eliminate bunt
attempts by this player.
Setting the Bunting for a hit tendency to Never only stops a batter from attempting a
bunt in non-sacrifice and non-squeeze situations. If Sacrifice and Squeeze
bunting tendencies are not set to never as well, it is still possible for a
batter to get a bunt single if he beats one out in a sacrifice or squeeze bunt
situation.
Similarly, if you set Sacrifice bunting to Never but do not do the same for Squeeze
bunting, it is possible for a hitter to sacrifice in squeeze situations. This is
why the batter would compile sac hit statistics.
Hit and run. DMB players don't have a
hit and run rating, but the computer manager does look at a player's skills to
determine how often he should be asked to execute a hit and run play.
Strikeout-prone hitters are less likely to be called upon, while contact hitters
and slower runners (who are prone to grounding into double plays) are more
likely to participate in a hit and run play. You can use the hit and run
tendency to increase, decrease, or eliminate the hit and run play when this
player is batting.
Stealing. As is the case with bunting,
this tendency is quite straightforward. The computer manager will continue to
rely on the ratings of the players involved (jump and steal for the runner, hold
for the pitcher, throwing for the catcher) and the game situation to decide when
a steal attempt makes sense. You can, however, use this tendency to increase or
decrease the attempt rate for a player, or eliminate steal attempts
altogether.
Running. This tendency governs how
many chances the computer manager will take on the base paths. When the computer
manager makes a running decision, it compares the chances of gaining the extra
base safely to a minimum threshold based on the game situation.
The chances of gaining the extra base are determined by the nature of the
batted ball, whether the runner was going on the pitch or on contact, the
running rating of the runner, and the throwing rating of the outfielder.
The minimum threshold is based on the game situation and whether it makes
more sense to play for one run (as in the late innings of a close game) or a big
inning. Depending on the number of outs and where the runners are situated, the
value of taking the extra base can be high or low, as can be the cost of getting
thrown out. The computer manager takes these factors into consideration when
deciding how high the chances of success need to be to justify taking the risk
of getting thrown out.
The Running tendency controls the minimum threshold. If you choose "less
frequent" or "least frequent", the minimum threshold rises. That causes the
computer manager to send the runner only when the chances of success are higher.
If you choose "more frequent" or "more frequent", the minimum threshold is
lowered, and the computer manager will take more chances with this runner.
Setting the Running tendency to Never
means that the runner will always be held if there is any chance he could be thrown out. Because
taking an extra base is automatic for even the worst runners on some batted
balls (e.g. very deep flies), especially if the hit and run is on or the runner
goes on contact with two out, players with a Running tendency of Never will run
from time to time. But you won't see them trying to advance when the outcome is
uncertain.

NOTE: The Running tendency does not apply to situations where
a batter tries to stretch a single into a double or a double into a triple. In
those cases, the batter/runner makes his own decision and is not influenced by
any manager or player tendency.
While it's true that you can dramatically reduce the number of outs your
players make on the bases by assigning the Never tendency, that doesn't
necessarily mean it's good strategy. You may miss out on high percentage
opportunities to score a runner from third on a fly ball or from second on a
single, and if the other hitters don't cash those runs in, your team will leave
more runners on base. You may also hit into more double plays if your runners
aren't taking advantage of running opportunities.
Taking pitches. This tendency enables
you to increase or decrease the likelihood that your best hitters will have the green light to swing
with three balls and no strikes. It
doesn't affect any other counts. And you don't need to use this tendency to
prevent your weaker hitters from swinging at 3-0 pitches because the computer
manager never gives the green light to weaker hitters.
Pinch hitting tendencies


There are four tendencies in the category of "Remove for pinch hitter" that
govern how often this player should be lifted in different situations:


  • the "Versus LHP" and "Versus RHP" tendencies enable you to indicate
    how seriously the computer manager should consider using a pinch hitter in place
    of this player. Choose Never to tell the computer manager not to pinch hit for
    this player (except perhaps in blowout situations).


NOTE: Player tendencies were introduced in version 9. In
previous versions, different manager profile settings called "can be PH for"
enabled you to indicate that a player should never be replaced by a pinch hitter
against left- or right-handed pitchers. Those settings no longer exist, and when
you convert a DMB database to version 9 format, they are assigned to the "versus
LHP" and "versus RHP" player tendencies instead.


  • the "In a platoon" tendency applies
    only if this player is in the starting lineup and a platoon partner is listed in
    the depth chart at his position. To prevent a player from being removed for a
    platoon partner, choose Never. (You can
    achieve this same effect more easily by removing the platoon player from the
    depth chart.)

  • the "In blowouts" tendency applies
    only in the late innings of a game in which one team has a very big
    lead.

In all game situations other than blowouts, the computer manager uses a pinch
hitter only if he is rated to be better than the scheduled hitter against the current pitcher. This assessment
takes into account the handedness and the left/right splits of both the batter
and the pitcher.
The player tendencies for pinch hitting indicate how much better the pinch
hitter needs to be. A "least frequent" setting tells the computer manager to
pinch hit less often; that is, only when the pinch hitter is much better than
the scheduled hitter. A "most frequent" setting tells the computer manager to
pinch hit more aggressively; that is, even when the pinch hitter is only a
little better than the scheduled hitter.
Pinch hitting in blowouts is a different matter altogether. In these
situations, the goal is not to gain an advantage, it's to replace the team's
better players to reduce their risk of injury. In blowouts, the computer manager
generally replaces a better player with a weaker one, so the relative strength
of the players is not a concern. Instead, the blowout pinch hitting tendency
influences the computer manager decisions about (a) how big a lead is needed for
the game to be treated as a blowout and (b) how early in the game it will begin
to remove players.
In blowout situations, the "In blowouts" tendency takes precedence over the
other pinch hitting tendencies. If a player's tendencies are set to Never for the three non-blowout situations, he
can still be replaced by a pinch hitter in a blowout.
Pitching tendencies


Most of these tendencies have the same meaning as in the context of manager tendencies, so we won't describe them again
here.
Using relievers, Using closers. These settings indicate how
aggressively the computer manager should go to the bullpen with this pitcher already in the game. They
have no any impact on how often this pitcher is brought into the game in the
first place.
The Never setting for "Using
relievers" and "Using closers" doesn't really
mean never
. It would be highly unrealistic to ask a pitcher to stay in
the game no matter how tired he gets or how hard he's being hit. The computer
manager always reserves the right to lift a tired or ineffective pitcher
regardless of your tendencies, though it will stick with an ineffective pitcher
longer if you choose "less frequent", "least frequent", or "never".
Instead, a setting of Never tells the computer manager to keep this pitcher
in the game until he gets tired, until he loses effectiveness, or until the
opposing team creates a meaningful threat, whichever comes first. With this
setting, the computer manager won't go to a setup man or closer just because
that potential reliever is a better pitcher.

TIP: If you want a closer to be used as often as possible,
set the team's manager
tendency
for "Using closers" to "most
frequent". Or, if you want a little more control, set the "Using closers"
tendency for some of the team's starting pitchers and middle relievers to "most
frequent".

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Re: Running the sim

Post by fisherboy7 on Sat Apr 12, 2008 2:03 am

Jay, it looks interesting but to be honest, it's waaay more complicated than I had intended this to be. What I had intended was a fun, strategic draft with some interesting discussion throughout and afterward. Maybe a sim league is something people might want to pursue later, but for now I'd like to see us just have fun doing this draft.

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Re: Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Sat Apr 12, 2008 2:35 am

It looks more comlpicated than it really is. There are default management settings. These are just the tweeks a person can make if they want to. All the hard work is actually on my end entering rosters, setting up the sched, etc

Jay

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Re: Running the sim

Post by jmk59 on Sat Apr 12, 2008 12:03 pm

I was going to ask whether the sim had an auto mode or whatever. I can't participate right now (lots of work travel, plus final exams), but have been watching this with great interest. If the software has a default mode that lets managers make typical decisions without input, so only the starting lineups need to be entered, I think it would be very interesting to run a few.

You guys don't even have to set a schedule like a regular fantasy league. Just set the rosters and then pick the match ups you'd like to see. You could run one sim every few days and discuss. So instead of being a competitive venture like FL's, it would just be another dimension of the interesting discussions that Ben started out hoping to generate.

You wouldn't even have to do all of them - you could cherry-pick just the matchups of particular interest. If you did around two a week you could get through all of them in about a year. Maybe too long and maybe too many less interesting match ups. But maybe not.

I just think it would be interesting even if you guys only ran 3-5 sims on default mode so we can see how the program would have a Mathewson/Mantle come out. Or a Young/Gehrig.

Just a few words from your friendly neighborhood back-seat driver. I'll return to my seat in the bleachers now.

J
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Re: Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Sat Apr 12, 2008 12:31 pm

The only real input I would need to make the sim run is what your starting line up would be, your starting rotation and the reliever roles. The manager tweeks only need to be entered once. Basically, you can set your management style to default, play for the 3-run homer or play bunt/sacrice. You can also decide how agressive to be on the basepaths, among other things. once all that is set, you don't need to make any more tweeks. The posts above just go into great detail about how the AI works and why you would or wouldn't want to use each strategy.

Injuries do play a factor in the sim. If the player was injury prone, they will miss a few games over the season, or even end up on the DL. It would be interesting to run the season on one week of the season at a time, that way we can talk smack about that weeks games and happenings. If this goes over well, we could set up things up so the league is played out over 3 or 4 months and then a new league could be drafted again.

The player disk has over 1700 players, so a league of 20+ teams is more than feasible.

Jay

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Re: Running the sim

Post by bowlingshoeguy on Sat Apr 12, 2008 3:09 pm

I like the idea of a sim, puts the teams application to use. Not sure if we use the first draft and use Ben's theory for this one. But the second one should be 12 or 16 teams so a balanced schedule can be worked out. The sims are fun because they keep stats and possible injuries.

If we use this draft obviously we need to make some adjustments.

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Re: Running the sim

Post by fisherboy7 on Sat Apr 12, 2008 3:12 pm

bowlingshoeguy wrote:If we use this draft obviously we need to make some adjustments.

We can use this draft no problem. After the initial 16 rounds are completed as planned, we can run an expansion draft (8 rounds or so) to fill in the slots necessary for a full a roster in the sim.

And I like the idea of everyone running their teams on default after the initial settings are inputed in the sim. That way we'll have an even playing field.

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Re: Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Sat Apr 12, 2008 4:25 pm

The only problem is that if you have a team full of base stealers, you can't mazimize that. Conversely, if you a team full of Kingmans, you can't maximize the 3-run HR inning.

I can run one season at default and then run it again with people's managerial choices and we can see how much of a difference that makes.

Jay

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Re: Running the sim

Post by fisherboy7 on Sat Apr 12, 2008 4:33 pm

sabrjay wrote:I can run one season at default and then run it again with people's managerial choices and we can see how much of a difference that makes.

I like that idea. First time around run on default to keep it simple, then when we do another draft down the road, (with more teams next time) we'll be more used to the system and can tweak the managerial choices. righton

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Re: Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Sun Apr 13, 2008 2:35 pm

I just got an newsletter from Diamond-Mind explaining why they haven't been able to create a Deadball Era format for the All-Time Greats disk

Deadball Era. Many of you have been asking about our plans for the Deadball Era. As posted long ago, we had difficulty getting this to work to our standards for quality. As you know, baseball in the Deadball Era was a vastly different game. Among the more notable issues are translating players from the post-1920 game who clearly would’ve been vastly different ballplayers then, if they could have played at all. Take Greg Luzinksi – do his home runs translate into triples or fly outs? Can you imagine The Bull and players like him getting many triples? While a Honus Wagner could have adapted to modern baseball (high average, speed, defense are still valuable), it’s more difficult to imagine a Luzinski doing the reverse, going from modern ball to Deadball without any speed or defense.

Another major issue is pitching and roster management. Rosters were smaller, and there were very few relievers. Since the Computer Manager was designed to optimize bullpen usage with at least 4 starting pitchers and 4 relievers, it is not managing the pitching as was
typical in the Deadball Era.

When we first promised the Deadball Era, we thought that some minor adjustments would be enough to make it work. However, testing indicated this was clearly insufficient, so we postponed its release until we could do more research. Unfortunately, that research indicated we would need to do some significant modifications to both the internet and simulation engine sides of the system. It’s complex work, but we hope to be able to do this later this year. We’re sorry it didn’t work out. Rest assured, we still want to do it. Heck, we want to play it, too!

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Re: Running the sim

Post by Griffins on Mon Apr 14, 2008 1:57 am

Is this the same Diamond Mind that does this ?
It sounds the same, only they run the entire thing online.
If so it's very, very random. I've played 5 seasons now with a bunch of other collectors, and it has little to do with reality. Walter Johnson is often a horrible pitcher, last 2 seasons Ken Raffensburger was the top pitcher. While it's interesting, if it's the same equations as the online game don't expect to be anything other than a game of pure chance, with little or no skill involved.

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Re: Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Mon Apr 14, 2008 2:06 am

Diamond Mind put their name on someone else's product. I've never played the online version. I have the computer game. After you buy the basic game there past season disks you can buy. There is also an All-time Greats disk that you can buy. This what we are using. Everything will be run on my computer. Nothing happens online except the draft here.

Jay

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Re: Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Sat Apr 19, 2008 3:38 am

I just got the player disk in the mail today. I'll be spending the weekend see what the roster requirements, etc are. I suspect we will need 2 catchers.

Jay

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Re: Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Sat Apr 19, 2008 5:15 am

You will definitely need catchers.

The game is geared towards specific OF positions as far as defense goes. You can put an OFer in any slot, but if they never played there, they will get a Poor rating.

Injuries are random, so just becuase you have Gehrig or Ripken doesn't guarentee that they won't get hurt.

There are 50 different parks to choose from, so let me what park you want for your home field and I'll make sure it's available. Sorry, no 19c parks are available.

Jay

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Re: Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Sat Apr 19, 2008 2:18 pm

I just found a setting for injuries. I set it so it matches a players historical injury rate.

Jay

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Re: Running the sim

Post by sabrjay on Sat Apr 19, 2008 3:46 pm

Found one problem so far, Albert Puljos was drafted but he doesn't meet the minimum standards to have been selected for the all-time greats database we are using for the sim. Reading thru the requirements, it looks like they need about 10 years and certain minimums in stats before they put a player in the database

Jay

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